Quantum Signal seeks test subjects for USDOT-funded driver education simulator

Drivers fresh out of training understand the mechanics of navigating in an automobile but don’t have the real-world experience that helps seasoned motorists avoid hazards. That’s where a new driving simulator called LookOut, developed by Saline-based Quantum Signal, comes in.

 

The company has developed the PC-based, game-like simulator with grant funding from the U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT). Quantum Signal is collaborating with the USDOT’s Volpe Center on the project.

 

Quantum Signal has been in business about 17 years, providing technology-based solutions to problems ranging from autonomous robot navigation to improving car safety. The company has previously built a tactical driving simulator for the Secret Service, so LookOut is a natural extension of Quantum Signal's work.

 

Quantum Signal CEO Mitchell Rohde says the simulator helps prepare new drivers for common hazards – such as people or animals who may suddenly appear from behind a row of parked cars.

 

"Folks familiar with driving would be careful, knowing that parked cars could obscure their view. People who aren’t experienced won’t recognize that and will drive by at full speed," Rohde says.

 

Quantum Signal has spent about three years developing LookOut, and it’s now in the testing phase. Rohde said Quantum Signal will learn from the data obtained from study subjects and use those findings to improve the tool.

 

"Once we get a sufficient number of subjects to go through the experiment in the lab, we can measure whether people improve their hazard perception while using the tool," Rohde said. "If it’s shown to be really effective in the lab we will want to see if it will improve folks’ performance in the real world, but there are safety issues with that. So the more we can do virtually, the better off we’ll be."

 

Quantum Signal is currently recruiting drivers 16 to 18 years old and 65 to 75 years old. Subjects get a gift card for participating in testing, and those who refer someone for the experiment also get gift certificates, Rohde said. Anyone interested in participating may call (734) 890-6550 or email drivingstudy2017@gmail.com.

This piece is part of a series highlighting local business growth in the Ann Arbor area. It is supported by Ann Arbor SPARK.

Sarah Rigg is a freelance writer and editor in Ypsilanti Township. You may reach her at sarahrigg1@gmail.com.

All images courtesy of Quantum Signal.

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