Records Redone puts new spin on old vinyl, expands to five retail outlets

Two friends with a penchant for music are putting a new spin on old vinyl by repurposing records into conversation-starting décor.
 
With creative operations in Lansing, Records Redone transforms 33-1/3 long-playing records into silhouettes of recording artists, city skylines, or custom images on request. The recreated works are suitable for framing, says co-owner Derek Vaive, and are a perfect way to up cycle less-than-collectible records gathering dust in basements or attics.
 
"We had both been vinyl junkies for a long time," says Vaive who co-owns the online business with Michael Fleyte. "We came up this idea to take what we had around the house and see what we could come up with."
 
Vaive and Fleyte started by cutting the 2-D sculptures by hand using a Dremel tool. The initial pieces got friends talking and prompted requests for custom works. Within months, the two began retailing their creations through a novelty store in Chicago.
 
Since laying down those first tracks in 2012, Records Redone has spun its way into retail outlets in Lansing, Ann Arbor, Chicago, Denver, Minnesota and New Orleans. Five of those connections, Vaive says, were made in 2014.
 
Bestselling pieces include the Beatles, Johnny Cash, Jimi Hendrix and Elvis. City skylines like Detroit and Chicago also make the top 10. Custom works have included a skyline for the Country Music Hall of Fame, and silhouettes of U.S. presidents for a D.C. restaurant. Pieces typically retain the original recording label, or customers can choose to embellish with a signature Records Redone label.
 
Because of demand, Vaive and Fleyte switched their means of production to a custom-built CNC machine. Images are designed on laptop, cut by machine, and meticulously trimmed and cleaned by hand. All production is done in a home-based workshop, with business driven online. Customers can supply their own record, or request vinyl from the Records Redone stock.
 
Charting a record year in 2014, Vaive and Fleyte are looking to possibly hire an employee and open a brick-and-mortar shop.
 
"It's great," he says. "It's amazing what's happened since that first request from a friend for a hand-made disc."
 
Source: Derek Vaive, Co-Owner, Records Redone
Writer: Ann Kammerer, News Editor
 
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